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Spotify makes moves to protect users from harmful content

Patrick Devaney

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Spotify is a huge music streaming platform with a global reach that is therefore operating in multiple languages across many different countries. Whereas this is great for the bottom line and nobody can argue that Spotify isn’t the dominant music streaming platform, it does cause certain problems and headaches when it comes to moderating harmful content across so many different languages and even dialects. To fix this situation and help keep Spotify users protected from such content, the streaming company has purchased Kinzen to help moderate content on the platform.

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Spotify has had a partnership with content moderation specialists Kinzen since 2020. Kinzen uses highly trained staff and machine learning models to help detect and pull harmful content loaded online. To build on this, however, Spotify has just announced that it has acquired Kinzen, bringing the machine learning models and Kinzen workers into Spotify.

Spotify makes moves to protect users from harmful content

Discussing the move, Spotify’s Global Head of Public Affairs, Dustee Jenkins had this to say in the blog post announcing the move:

“We’ve long had an impactful and collaborative partnership with Kinzen and its exceptional team. Now, working together as one, we’ll be able to even further improve our ability to detect and address harmful content, and importantly, in a way that better considers local context. This investment expands Spotify’s approach to platform safety, and underscores how seriously we take our commitment to creating a safe and enjoyable experience for creators and users.”

The move means that Spotify will receive early warnings about potential harmful content problems and issues across all markets, meaning it will be able to more effectively moderate content in multiple languages.

In other recent Spotify news, the company is continuing to augment its audio options by launching an audiobook service in the US to add to its already popular music and podcast offerings.

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